5th Joint Meeting
Acoustical Society of America and Acoustical Society of Japan

Honolulu, Hawaii
28 Nov. – 2 Dec. 2016

PRESS REGISTRATION: We will grant free registration to credentialed journalists and professional freelance journalists. If you are a reporter and would like to attend, contact Emilie Lorditch (elorditc@aip.org, 301-209-3029) who can also help with setting up interviews and obtaining images, sound clips, or background information.

The press conference/wbcast is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov 30 10-11am HAST in room Lolani I (on the second floor of the Tapa Tower).

1.John Allen from the University of Hawaii will explain the chirp of the coconut beetle

2. Ashlee Lillis from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute will describe the sound made by snapping shrimp.

3. Emily Blamire from the University of Toronto will discuss vocal attractiveness in females

Lay Language Papers

MEMBERS OF THE PRESS – To search by Author, Abstract Code or Date (e.g. October 29) – simply enter the author name, abstract code or date in the search box to the right.  To search for ALL papers matching a certain Category or Meta tag, click on the appropriate link on the sidebar.

1aNS4 – Musical mind control: Human speech takes on characteristics of background music – Ryan Podlubny

People often adjust their speech to resemble that of their conversation partners – a phenomenon known as speech convergence. Broadly defined, convergence describes automatic synchronization to some external source, much like running to the beat of music playing at the gym without intentionally choosing to do so.

4aPPa24 – Effects of meaningful or meaningless noise on psychological impression for annoyance and selective attention to stimuli during intellectual task – Takahiro Tamesue

Open offices that make effective use of limited space and encourage dialogue, interaction, and collaboration among employees are becoming increasingly common. However, productive work-related conversation might actually decrease the performance of other employees within earshot

2aABa3 – Indris’ melodies are individually distinctive and genetically driven – Marco Gamba

Human hearing ablities are exceptional at identifying the voices of friends and relatives [1]. The potential for this identification lies in the acoustic structures of our words, which not only convey verbal information (the meaning of our words) but also non-verbal cues (such as sex and identity of the speakers).

2aNS – How virtual reality technologies can enable better soundscape design – Chung

While many governments have placed special attention to waste management, air and water pollution, acoustic environment in cities has been directed toward the control of noise, in particular, transportation noise. Governments that care about the tranquility in cities rely primarily on setting the so-called acceptable noise level

2pABa1 – Snap chat: listening in on the peculiar acoustic patterns of snapping shrimp, the noisiest animals on the reef – Ashlee Lillis

Put your head underwater in almost any tropical or sub-tropical coastal area and you will hear a continuous, static-like noise filling the water. The source of this ubiquitous sizzling sound found in shallow-water marine environments around the world was long considered a mystery of the sea.

2pAOb -Methane in the ocean: observing gas bubbles from afar – Tom Weber

The more we look, the more we find bubbles of methane, a greenhouse gas, leaking from the ocean floor (e.g., [1]). Some of the methane in these gas bubbles may travel to the ocean surface where it enters the atmosphere, and some is consumed by microbes, generating biomass and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide in the process

Recent Pressroom Posts & Lay Language Papers

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