2019 SCA Cal View

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March 2019
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March 6, 2019

Review on Acoustic Metasurfaces

Badreddine
ASSOUAR
badreddine.assouar@univ-lorraine.fr
Yes
1239649
Author, Creator
Acoustics Professional
“Acoustic Metasurfaces”. Nature Reviews Materials 3, (2018) 460.

____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

We publishsed in 2018 the first review on acoustic metasurfaces which is a very emerging and new topic in Acoustics.

Building on the success of bulk metamaterials in the past decade, acoustic metasurfaces have significantly advanced the field of wave manipulation, enabling the design of miniaturized materials and devices with com- plex and unprecedented functionalities. One of the main reasons for the interest in acoustic metasurfaces is the challenge of using bulk acoustic metamaterials to manipulate the sound of long wavelengths in air and water. The use of metasurfaces — in the form of thin and lightweight structures — is an ingenious way to overcome this problem.

In this Review, we delineated the fundamental physics of metasurfaces, described their different concepts and design strategies, and discuss their functionalities for controllable reflection, transmission and extraordinary absorption.

Print, Online Website

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://acoustics.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/NRM-Final.pdf


 

7
March 7, 2019

Física y Psicoacústica (Physics and Psychoacoustics)

HORACIO
CRISTIANI
hcristiani@mah.org.ar
Yes
Corresponding Electronic Associate
Creator
Acoustics Professional
Física y Psicoacústica

305 viewers

146 subscribers

This is a tool used by audiology students who are taking courses in acoustics and psychoacoustics. It uses the same platform they use to interact socially with their peers and thus try to convey content in a visual and friendly way. Special importance is given to the different characters in the history of these sciences, emphasizing their contributions.

Online Website

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://www.instagram.com/fisicaypsicoacustica/


 

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March 11, 2019

Sensing but Not Hearing: The Problem of Wind Turbine Noise (an interview with acoustician Steven Cooper, AU) By Sherri Lange, Steven Cooper

Sherri
Lange
kodaisl@rogers.com
Yes

Author
Journalist
Master Resource: a Market Energy Blog, based in Houston USA

2 million plus viewers
Unknown but more several million world wide: page views
Likely 2-3 million subscribers
N/A listeners

As in the email: France, Germany, Canada, and others have referenced this link and piece, and have posted. Picked up by the North Dakota Public Utilities Commission, in reference to understanding wind turbine problems for a pending proposed project. We were asked for permission to use.

The interview with Mr. Steven Cooper has turned out to be a turning point of sorts, with respect to people being able to more clearly understand the nature of pulsation and sub sounds, ILFN, and the cocktail of acoustic impacts from industrial wind turbines. Current dBA regulations are quite insufficient to protect people and animals, and even mask the real causes of harm from below 20 hz. Also the band from 20 to 200, Low Frequency. Steven’s clear ability to outline impacts and his reference to his ground breaking work at Bridgewater, AU, has helped innumerable people, policy makers and even medical professionals. It would be very suitable to honor him, and Master Resource, for the clarity provided.

Online Website

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://acoustics.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/SENSING-BUT-NOT-HEARING.docx

Sensing but Not Hearing: The Problem of Wind Turbine Noise (Interview with acoustician Steven Cooper, AU)


 

12
March 12, 2019

20,000 dBs Under the Sea

Douglas
Mast
doug.mast@uc.edu
No
tedium (account # 1178056)
Author, Creator, Producer
Journalist
Episode #19 of podcast Twenty Thousand Hertz, published July 11, 2017

Unknown. They have 14 listed sponsors, so their circulation is apparently substantial.

This podcast presents “the stories behind the world’s most recognizable and interesting sounds,” with solid research backed by entertaining and engaging writing and sound design. This episode covers the gamut of underwater acoustics, including sound, physics of propagation, sonar, and sounds of human, animal, and unknown origin. I think it’s a great example of making acoustics interesting and accessible to a wider audience.

Online Website

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://www.20k.org/episodes/underthesea


 

13
March 13, 2019

Clemson’s Acoustic Stage Collaboration with OU’s Daniel Butko

Daniel
Butko
butko@ou.edu
Yes
1047282
Author
Acoustics Professional
https://cucsaw.wixsite.com/csaw/acousticalstage

____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

Before, during, and after the performance at the CBA conference, Associate Professor Daniel Butko, who specializes in acoustical research at The University of Oklahoma, was invited to perform testing on the stage and lead a weeklong acoustically-related workshop with Clemson students. His feedback was collected and will be used for future set stage designs to improve both their acoustical performance and ability to be adaptable for a variety of uses. The collaboration with Butko provided valuable insight into technical and sensory aspects of built environments which often go unnoticed or undervalued. Butko’s expertise helped bridge between architecture and performance.

Online Website

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://acoustics.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Butko-Clemson-letter-2.pdf
https://cucsaw.wixsite.com/csaw/acousticalstage


 March 13, 2019

Acoustics in Performance

Richard
Honeycutt
rhoneycutt@triad.twcbc.com
Yes
: 1001018
Author
Acoustics Professional
Book published by Elektor International Media B. V.

____ viewers
___155 copies sold as of 2/15/ 2019_ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

Often the owner, primary user, or designers of a venue are ignorant of the importance and basic principles of acoustics. Sometimes, they recognize their ignorance, but often, they had picked up enough “street knowledge” to be dangerous. In either case, the outcome is poor acoustics in the venue: lack of speech intelligibility, unsuitable musical environment, excess (sometimes dangerously so) noise. Acoustics in Performance was written specifically for theater managers and directors, facilities directors, Ministers of Music, recording engineers, and live-sound operators whose activities depend upon an understanding of acoustics in order to succeed.

Print

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://acoustics.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Content_-Acoustics_Elektor-Final.pdf


 March 13, 2019

What Was that Masked Sound, Anyway?

Richard
Honeycutt
rhoneycutt@triad.twcbc.com
Yes
1001018
Author
Acoustics Professional
AudioXpress Magazine

____ viewers
____ page views
17,475____ subscribers
____ listeners

When I was offered the opportunity to publish a monthly column on acoustics in AudioXpress magazine, I accepted gladly. The column reaches both amateurs and professionals in the audio field, but not many acoustics professionals. The column on acoustical masking I am submitting was written to help readers understand what masking can and cannot do, hopefully leading to a more intelligent use of the technology when it is employed.

Print

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://acoustics.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/RHSoundControl_AXAug2018.pdf


 

14
March 14, 2019

Explainer: Why the human voice is so versatile

Noel
Hanna
n.hanna@unswglobal.unsw.edu.au
Yes
000001245684
Author
Acoustics Professional
The Conversation (website)

More than 11,000 page views. Increasing at a rate of about 2000/year.
48 Tweets
876 Facebook shares
9 Comments

Republished by:
Phys.org
Cosmos Magazine
Australasian Science

This article answers a commonly asked question about the human voice in a concise way with relatable examples. It has been widely read and shared, and so acts as an introduction to some aspects of acoustics, phonetics, physics and engineering for a very broad audience. As a result, I have been asked to give public talks and even presented a sold-out arts/science workshop for the “This Is A Voice” exhibition (https://sydneyscience.com.au/2017/event/print-your-voice/) at the Museum of Arts and Applied Sciences (Sydney, Australia). These events have both broadened and deepened the understanding of acoustics research to the general public.

Online Website

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://theconversation.com/explainer-why-the-human-voice-is-so-versatile-69800


 March 14, 2019

2017 – 2018 sOUnd Lab Science Communication

Angela
Person
a@ou.edu
No
1047282 – ID of nominee
Creator, Producer
Acoustics Professional
Gibbs College of Architecture Oculus Blog, published throughout 2017-2018

These stories about Prof. Butko’s acoustics research received over 230 views on the Oculus Blog; in addition, these stories were emailed out to over 4,000 alumni and ~900 faculty and students, via the Oculus Newsletter.

The University of Oklahoma College of Architecture Associate Director and Professor Daniel Butko specializes in architectural acoustics – a topic which he teaches, researches, and practices within the profession. His dedication to integration of acoustics into architecture curriculum objectives and pedagogy is evident in his numerous guest lectures, conference presentations, journal articles, and projects with both Undergraduate and Graduate students. Recent web-based stories showcased here were made possible through funded research, industry partners, community volunteers, and dedicated students. Butko’s intentional and deliberate practice in acoustics has fostered student-centric learning during classroom assignments, field trips, laboratory visits, conferences, and industry collaboration.

Online Website

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

https://gibbs.oucreate.com/tag/daniel-butko/


 

15
March 15, 2019

Neuroscientist Explains the Laurel vs. Yanny Phenomenon | WIRED

Tyler
Perrachione
tkp@bu.edu
No
1115942
Author, Producer
Journalist
Youtube.com (via Wired.com) 5/16/2018

3,166,536 viewers (to date)

The “Yanny vs. Laurel” recording was the most widely discussed acoustics topics in the popular press in recent memory This audio recording, and discussion about it, was featured for days by local and international news channels, amateur internet personalities, and casual conversations worldwide. In this video, science journalist Louise Matsakis and producer Wonbo Woo explored the acoustic, perceptual, and cognitive bases of this phenomenon in an interview with an auditory neuroscientist. The work does an extraordinary job distilling this complex phenomenon for the public.

Online Video

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360


 March 15, 2019

A Quiet Place: Acoustical Review

Shirin
Escarcha
escarcha@bkl.ca
No

Author
Acoustics Professional
BKL.ca Website – May 24, 2018

__N/A__ viewers
__N/A__ page views
__N/A__ subscribers
__N/A__ listeners

*Our website did not have Google Analytics until late 2018*

To provide an accessible understanding of noise control for the layman, David has compared the sound-sensitive survival tactics from Hollywood’s recent dystopian horror film “A Quiet Place”, with everyday noise concerns experienced by building occupants, audiences and general listeners.

The result? An acoustical survival guide, which ensures that readers live another day should they ever find themselves falling prey of an unknown species with acutely sensitive hearing. This zany, analogous, pun-heavy and clear narrative is both informative and memorable for acousticians and movie enthusiasts alike.

Online Website

Nominated works can be submitted in one of two ways:
1) provide a URL that links directly to the nominated work, or
2) upload a file. Acceptable file formats are pdf, jpg, avi, mp4…

If the nominated work is a book, please upload the title page and table of contents in pdf format and contact the Acoustical Society office to arrange for access to the full work for review by members of the selection committee.
[asa@acousticalsociety.org] (516) 576-2360

A Quiet Place: An Acoustical Review


 

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March 2, 2018

Acoustics and the Falcon Heavy Launch

WeSaam
Lepak
wlepak@purdue.edu
Yes

Author, Creator, Producer
Acoustics Professional
YouTube, Mar 2nd 2018

Posted on the University of Hartford’s website and YouTube.

WeSaam Lepak and Jarrett Lagler, two University of Hartford Students (class of 2018), recorded the launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy in Feb 2018 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center to describe the physics of sonic booms and the speed of sound. Predictions of the quantity of sonic booms and the sound’s time delay were made prior to the launch and were validated by subsequent experimental results.

The SpaceX Falcon Heavy was a momentous event watched by millions around the world. Lepak and Lagler aimed to take advantage of this cultural phenomenon as an opportunity to educate the public on acoustic principles. Through engaging dialogue and clever video editing, this educational acoustics video is accessible to the general public as no technical background is required.

Online Video

http://www.hartford.edu/ceta/about-us/news-stories/rocket-sounds.aspx


 

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Science Writing Awards 2015-2016

2015-2016

Journalist

Ryan Kellman
Video
Singing Ice: A Star Wars Story
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OC7_zpyqCrU

Acoustic Professionals

David T. Bradley, Erica Ryherd, and Lauren Ronsse (editors)
Acoustics of Worship Spaces: three decades of design (Springer-Verlag, 2016)

Tyler Adams
Sound Materials: A Compendium of Sound Absorbing Materials for Architecture and Design  (Frame Publishers, November 2016)

Science Writing Awards 2013 – 2014

2013 – 2014

Journalist

Kelly Servick
Eavesdropping on Echosystems
Science 21 Feb 2014
Vol. 343, Issue 6173, pp. 834-837

Professionals

Trevor Cox
The Science of the Sonic Wonders of the World
W. W. Norton & Co.

Your ears never sleep: auditory processing of nonwords during sleep in children – Adrienne Roman

Your ears never sleep: auditory processing of nonwords during sleep in children

 

 

 

 

Adrienne Roman – adrienne.s.roman@vumc.org

Carlos Benitez – carlos.r.benitez@vanderbilt.edu

Alexandra Key – sasha.key@vanderbilt.edu

Anne Marie Tharpe – anne.m.tharpe@vumc.org

 

The brain needs a variety of stimulation from the environment to develop and grow. The ability for the brain to change as a result of sensory input and experiences is often referred to as experience-dependent plasticity. When children are young, their brains are more susceptible to experience-dependent plasticity (e.g., Kral, 2013) so the quantity and quality of input is important. Because our ears are always “on”, our auditory system receives a lot of input to process, especially while we are awake. But, what can we “hear” when we are asleep? And, does what we hear while we are asleep help our brains develop?

 

Although there has been research in infants and adults examining the extent to which our brains process sounds during sleep, very little research has focused on young children, a group that sleeps a significant portion of their day (Paruthi et al., 2016). We decided to start our investigation by trying to answer the question, do children process and retain information heard during sleep? To investigate this question, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to measure the electrical activity of children’s brains in response to different sounds – sounds they heard when asleep and sounds they heard when awake.

 

First, during the child’s regular naptime, each child was hooked up to a portable EEG. Using EEG, a technician could tell us when the child went to sleep. Once asleep, we played the child three made-up words over and over in random order for ten minutes. Then, we let the child continue to sleep until he or she woke up.

 

When the children awoke from their naps, we took them to our EEG lab for event-related potential (ERP) testing. ERPs are segments of on-going EEG recordings appearing as waveforms that reflect the brain’s response to  events or stimulation (such as a sound played).

 

The children wore “hats” consisting of 128 spongy electrodes while listening to the same three made-up words heard during the nap mixed in with new made-up words that the children never heard before. We then analyzed the ERPs, to determine if the children’s brains responded differently to the words played during sleep than to the new words the children had not heard before. We were looking for ‘memory traces’ in the EEG that would indicate that the children ‘remembered’ the words heard while sleeping.

 

We found that children’s brains were able to differentiate the nonsensical words “heard” during the nap from the brand new words played during the ERP testing. This means that the brain did not just filter the information coming in, but also retained it long enough to recognize it after they woke up. This is the first step in understanding the impact of a child’s auditory environment during sleep on the brain.

 

 

Kral, A. (2013). Auditory critical periods: a review from system’s perspective.

Neuroscience, 247, 117-133.

Paruthi, S., Brooks, L. J., D’Ambrosio, C., Hall, W. A., Kotagal, S., Lloyd, R. M.,

Malow, B. A., Maski, K., Nichols, C., Quan, S. F., Rosen, C. L., Troester, M. M., & Wise, M.S. (2016). Recommended amount of sleep for pediatric populations: a consensus statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 12(6), 785.

 

1pSA8 – Thermoacoustics of solids – Can heat generate sound in solids? – Haitian Ho

Many centuries ago glass blowers observed that sound could be generated when blowing through a hot bulb from the cold end of a narrow tube. This phenomenon is a result of thermoacoustic oscillations: a pressure wave propagating in a compressible fluid (e.g. air) can sustain or amplify itself when being provided heat. To date, thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators have had remarkable impacts on many industrial applications.

After many centuries of thermoacoustic science in fluids, it seems natural to wonder if such a mechanism could also exist in solids. Is it reasonable to conceive thermoacoustics of solids? Can a metal bar start vibrating when provided heat?

The study of the effects of heat on the dynamics of solids has a long and distinguished history. The theory of thermoelasticity, which explains the mutual interaction between elastic and thermal waves, has been an active field of research since the 1950s. However, the classical theory of thermoelasticity does not address instability phenomena that can arise when considering the motion of a solid in the presence of a thermal gradient. In an analogous way to fluids, a solid element contracts when it cools down and expands when it is heated up. If the solid contracts less when cooled and expands more when heated, the resulting motion will grow with time. In other terms, self-sustained vibratory response of a solid could be achieved due to the application of heat. Such a phenomenon would represent the exact counterpart in solids of the well-known thermoacoustic effect in fluids.

By using theoretical models and numerical simulations, our study indicates that a small mechanical perturbation in a thin metal rod can give rise to sustained vibrations if a small segment of the rod is subject to a controlled temperature gradient. The existence of this physical phenomenon in solids is quite remarkable, so one might ask why it was not observed before despite the science of thermoacoustics have been known for centuries.

“Figure 1. The sketch of the solid-state thermoacoustic device and the plot of the self-amplifying vibratory response.”

It appears that, under the same conditions of mechanical excitation and temperature, a solid tends to be more “stable” than a fluid. The combination of smaller pressure oscillations and higher dissipative effects (due to structural damping) in solids tends to suppress the dynamic instability that is at the origin of the thermoacoustic response. Our study shows that, with a proper design of the thermoacoustic device, these adverse conditions can be overcome and a self-sustained response can be obtained. The interface conditions are also more complicated to achieve in a solid device and dictates a more elaborate design.

Nonetheless, this study shows clear theoretical evidence of the existence of the thermoacoustic oscillations in solids and suggests that applications of solid-state engines and refrigerators could be in reach within the next few years.